The 3 Least Energy-Efficient States in the Country | Think Realty
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The 3 Least Energy-Efficient States in the Country

Energy-Efficient

The research team compared the states across the dimensions of “home energy efficiency” and “auto energy efficiency”

Given that energy is one of the biggest household expenses for American consumers, it is not surprising that homeowners and renters alike say energy efficiency is important to them. However, not all buyers and tenants actually act on those stated preferences, and some states do not make being energy efficiency particularly easy. WalletHub ranked a list of 48 of the 50 U.S. states for energy efficiency. Alaska and Hawaii were excluded because of data limitations. The research team compared the states across the dimensions of “home energy efficiency” and “auto energy efficiency” and compared the results against national consumption patterns to create a relative scale.

The 3 Least Energy-Efficient States

According to the rankings, the least energy-efficient states are:

48th: South Carolina

South Carolina had a “total energy efficiency score” of 17.68 out of 100 and scored last for home energy efficiency and 44th for auto energy efficiency.

47th: Louisiana

Louisiana scored more than 10 points better than South Carolina on its total energy score with a 28.69. However, it was 47th for home energy efficiency. The state ranked 30th for auto energy efficiency.

46th: Alabama

Barely beating 47th-ranked Louisiana in total score with a 28.91, Alabama was actually 44th for home energy efficiency and 35th for auto.

Expert Recommendations on Improving Energy Efficiency

WalletHub asked a panel of experts how to improve energy efficiency in homes, and one expert, Sara Bronin, the Thomas F. Gallivan Chair of Real Property Law at the University of Connecticut School of Law, had some things to say on the topic that investors may find surprising. Specifically, when asked how to build an energy-efficient home, she responded, “I embrace the mantra that ‘the greenest building is one already built.’” She added, “Consumers may get discouraged if they think only a major renovation will make their home energy efficient” and suggested “low-hanging fruit” like replacing lightbulbs and sealing cracks.


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