Kansas City: Some Metrics on the Mid-size, Midwest Market | Think Realty | A Real Estate of Mind

Kansas City: Some Metrics on the Mid-size, Midwest Market

Kansas City is a mid-size metropolis that spans two states: Kansas and Missouri. Let’s take a look at the Missouri side of this former fur-trading post that lies on the banks of the Missouri River.  

With a population of 463,202 people and 147 constituent neighborhoods, Kansas City boasts a mixed workforce of both blue-collar and white-collar jobs. Overall, Kansas City is a city of sales and office workers, professionals, and service providers. There are especially a lot of people living in Kansas City who work in office and administrative support (16.34%), sales jobs (10.42%) and management occupations (8.83%). 

Also of interest is that Kansas City has more people living here who work in computers and math than 95% of the places in the US. 

Of the large cities in America, Kansas City is one of the most car-oriented. This is reflected in the urban landscape, which features highways, wide streets, parking lots, and shopping centers of all sizes. It is also reflected in the statistics: 83.05% of people in Kansas City drive to work in their own car everyday, most often alone. So, if you’re going to live in Kansas City, you’ll need to learn to love driving. Although, a streetcar opened a few years ago serving the downtown area and the city has plans to expand its route. 

Kansas City Information and Demographics 

The overall education level of Kansas City citizens is substantially higher than the typical US community, as 29.55% of adults in Kansas City have at least a bachelor’s degree, and the average American community has 21.84%. 

The per capita income in Kansas City in 2010 was $25,683, which is wealthy relative to Missouri, and upper middle income relative to the rest of the US. This equates to an annual income of $102,732 for a family of four. However, Kansas City contains both very wealthy and poor people as well. 

Kansas City is an extremely ethnically diverse city. The people who call Kansas City home describe themselves as belonging to a variety of racial and ethnic groups. The greatest number of Kansas City residents report their race to be White, followed by Black or African-American. Important ancestries of people in Kansas City include German, Irish, English and Italian. 

Information by Department of Numbers, Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Census Bureau and Location Incorporated are deemed reliable but not guaranteed.